Day 18: GlowScript/CoffeeScript Computational Model for Fluids

Today, AP Physics 2 students had the first opportunity to modify an existing computational model to prepare for tomorrow’s lab practicum. Tomorrow’s lab practicum is to predict where on the floor to place a cup such that the cup catches the water exiting from a 2L-bottle filled to the specified level and placed the specified distance from the floor. The computation model that I provided implements projectile motion and provides the framework for modeling the bottle and water. Students have to add the physics to calculate the initial velocity of the water. I also emphasized the importance of verifying your model against a known outcome before using it to predict an unknown outcome. Students are using Friday’s quiz as a test case for their model and verifying the prediction of the model against their hand calculations. While this lab practicum doesn’t require the use of a computational model, it is another representation in which the students demonstrate their understanding.

Day 18: GlowScript/CoffeeScript Computational Model for Fluids

We will see how wet the floor gets tomorrow!

  ##fluids ##practicumlab ##coffeescript ##glowscript ##chromebooks  

Lab Teamwork Rubric Check-In

I’ve been told quite a few times that my students are going to have some trouble with teamwork skills, like respectful discussion/disagreement, and making a commitment to their group during a lab activity. We needed one more day to finish collecting enough data for a proper pasta bridges graph, so I decided to use it as a chance to practice and assess “Lab Teamwork” directly. Here’s the rubric I used:
Lab Teamwork Rubric Check-In

(My four “lab manager roles” were marble manager, pasta manager, cup manager, and general manager. Having go-to roles made it much easier for students to just pick up the experiment and roll with it, rather than arguing over who did what.

One class got all M’s, which was beautiful to see. Another class got mostly P’s, with one group almost deserving an X. I didn’t have the heart to give it to them because two member of the group were really trying hard, but too shy to ask for cooperation from the other two.

Interestingly, when I asked my first class to “self-assess” their lab work using the rubric, every student but one gave themselves an MM… Those MMs are rare and very special, I explained afterward. It would be quite a surprise if you were doing “inspiring science” on your first lab of the year. It takes practice!

##physicsfirst ##expdesign. ##assessment

Lab Teamwork Rubric Check-In